Philippine National Police To Plant 10 Million Trees For National Greening Program

Philippine National Police To Plant 10 Million Trees For National Greening Program

Top News
March 5, 2012

A total of ten million trees will be planted nationwide by the Philippine National Police in support of the National Greening Program.

AsianScientist (Mar. 5, 2012) – A total of ten million trees will be planted nationwide by the Philippine National Police (PNP) in support of the National Greening Program (NGP), said Environment and Natural Resources Secretary Ramon J. P. Paje today.

PNP’s pledge of support for the NGP is based on a memorandum of agreement signed last week with PNP Director General Nicanor Bartolome, kicking off the “Pulis Makakalikasan: 10 Milyong Puno, Pamana sa Kinabukasan” project, or “Police for Nature: 10 Million Trees Heritage for the Future.”

The NGP, established on February 24, 2011 by President Aquino through Executive Order No. 26, is led by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) and co-implemented by the Departments of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform.

The Pulis Makakalikasan project will run up to February 28, 2013, and involve all 140,000 personnel of the PNP. Each will plant a total of 72 tree seedlings – or six tree seedlings per month – over the upcoming year.

“Taking his organization one step further beyond planting trees speaks loudly of General Bartolome’s resolve to mainstream Philippine environmentalism as one of his organization’s core values,” said Paje, who lauded the PNP for “going the extra mile.”

Under the agreement, the PNP will set up tree nurseries inside PNP camps throughout the country, assisted by DENR specialists who will help to coordinate the choice of seedlings and areas for planting. Planting sites will be accessible to forest communities who will help to maintain the planted seedlings.

For this year, the NGP has set itself an ambitious target to rehabilitate some 200,000 hectares and raise some 114 million planting materials, says the DENR.

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Source: DENR; Photo: treesftf/Flickr.
Disclaimer: This article does not necessarily reflect the views of AsianScientist or its staff.

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